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Merriam-Webster Dictionary makes an official beer clarification

Merriam-Webster Tallboy

Yesterday, Merriam-Webster – the 188-year-old English dictionary, made an announcement that 530 words have been added to their official pages in their latest official update.

While some of these new words you might hope get rendered archaic soon, like “vacay”, “fabulosity” or “Inspo” (which is short for inspiration for those that just don’t have the time to say the whole damn word), the online dictionary DID fix a glaring oversight in defining beer world.

Tallboy.

You’ve probably been drinking tallboys of beer for years now, especially as a record number of breweries are now canning their beer lineup.

The world tallboy already appeared in Merriam-Webster’s dictionary but lacked the clarification of what a tallboy in reference to beer. Apparently, a tallboy is another name for “highboy” or dresser in the furniture scape, but we’ve never seen in called that at Ikea. Honestly, we don’t know what ANYTHING is called in Ikea. (BTW, Ikea needs to sell beer in the cafe to pair with all those meatballs.)

“Until recently, we didn’t define the “beer” sense of ‘tallboy.’ That has been fixed.” Merriam-Webster tweeted.

As far as America is concerned, the “tallboy” refers to 16-ounce cans sizes. The “stovepipe” can is 19.2-ounces, and the 32-ounce can- a crowler. Which honestly is still single-serve depending on what kind of day you had.

Additionally, the word “sesh” was added to their pages, as in “drinking sesh.” Please, please use that phrase sparingly. Just go drinking.

Anyway, congratulations are in order to the “tallboy” beers. You’re legit now. Cheers.

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