Posted in Alpine Beer Company, Beer News

Alpine Beer Company Takes Stand Over Ebay Sales

Alpine Beer Company took a stand against those selling their beer on Ebay today.  The fact that bottles of Alpine’s Exponential Hoppiness on Ebay annoying owner Pat Mcilhenney enough, but when a growler popped up on the popular auction site, that was the last straw.  He’s now threatening to not only ban growlers, but to potentially never bottle the beer again.  The incident lead him to this in a recent newsletter.

You have seen your very last growler of “Exponential Hoppiness” ever to be dispensed.

Since I previously stated if I ever saw a growler of “Exponential Hoppiness” for sale on ebay there would never be another growler sold again. Don’t blame me, but you can see who to blame HERE. As for bottles of “Expo” on ebay, I’m seriously considering never bottling it again. This is not just a personal issue, it’s illegal. The fact that people drove down from LA to make a quick buck and denying the locals the chance to buy some is also just plain wrong.

So, you can see the timing of the releases listed above. The first two beers were released last week, the next comes out today and the last one comes out tomorrow. That is the most advanced notice you ever receive. Our little operation is focused on supplying the local market with fine beer. If you live in the area you can now get first crack at our releases before they can drive in from points unknown. That’s the best I can do for you, my loyal locals.

Obviously this raises a few questions.  First and foremost, once something is purchased from you, how do you control it?  Do you control it?  Isn’t that Ebay’s job?  Agree or disagree Mcilhenny is one of the first to take  a stand when it comes to this common occurrence.  Will this be the start of a new trend amongst brewers?

 

  • mike

    what is more sad, that these guys sell them on there, or that people will spend $20-$30 for a bottle of beer

    • Justin

      There’s nothing wrong with paying $20 – $30 for a bottle of beer…. as long as that’s the price set by the brewer.  Supporting the secondary market, no matter what the price is, only hurts everyone involved in the process.

  • James

    What’s truly sad is that this man thinks he should have a thing to say about what someone does with his product once it’s been sold.  It’s not his anymore, so why would he care if someone sells it on eBay?
     

  • Jean

    I’d be furious if somebody who couldn’t get to LA wanted to try my beer. 

  • Albacore

    This guy’s a whacko. He should increase his production to meet demand. Instead he’s cutting (via growlers), thereby hurting his local customers.